Number 62 (Beaver Brook Country Club)

20170728_153632 - Copy

Date played: 7/28/2017

Have you ever booked a tee time, and then realize that you had other commitments on the same day? Ever still try to make both happen? My story of the 62nd course on my quest went something like that.

Located in Annandale, NJ, Beaver Brook Country Club is a beautiful 18-hole layout that almost has a bit of everything. You could argue that it could use more water to contend with (if you’re a sadist), or perhaps some more forced carries (definitely sadist).

But, there ARE a couple forced carries, as well as a creek to deal with on a number of holes. There are a few good dog-legs, a drivable par 4, and a par 5 you can get to in two (if you’re a long hitter). There’s a par 3 where you can tuck the ball in REALLY close (more on that in a bit). There are narrow fairways, changes in elevation, and some approach shot-making decisions into well-placed pins on contoured greens. On top of all that, there is great service and the place is maintained wonderfully.

One of my closest friends let me know that he had won a certificate for a free foursome at Beaver Brook after winning a contest at an outing there last year. A free round for a new course on my journey was like a godsend. The tee time he booked was 2:18 pm. As I mentioned earlier, I had an obligation I forgot about, and that was at 6:30 pm. Only realizing this the day before the tee time, I needed a plan.

The issue was primarily the course being over an hour’s drive from home. Unsure of pace of play, I figured I would need to shoot for finishing about nine holes from the tee time and then heading out for my commitment. That meant I would just have to show up early and play nine beforehand. I would leave work early after a half-day, and finish the back nine just as we’d be called to the 1st tee by the starter.

Not quite.

It turns out that Beaver Brook doesn’t offer a nine-hole rate. I would guess that may be in part due to its interesting routing. The ninth hole actually finishes in a stretch across the clubhouse road and you don’t “make the turn” until the 13th green.

After talking to the staff in the pro shop and the starter a few times (shout out to Pam and Ed), they agreed to get me out for the going rate ($45 w/ cart). Figuring that it was a long way from home and – if I didn’t finish on that day – I’d have to come back anyway, this was as good as I could do. Alas, my free round became a normal round.

The starter (Ed) took me out to the 15th. I was able to play back to the clubhouse with no issue, and almost no wait. Only discovering at that point that the 10th tee was nowhere in sight, I decided to jump onto the par-3 14th, with the approaching foursome’s permission of course.

Having played 14-18, I figured a 2:18 tee time would be good enough to play the first 13 holes and get me home on time. After waiting for the rest of my group to show, we would be on our way at around 2:30. (Tardiness is next to godliness, am I right?)

Whether it was the anxiety of not getting out on time or the fact that I was playing with an injured hand/wrist, a great round eventually went bad. I played my first ten holes (15 to 18, then 14, then 1-5, if you lost track) in +5, which included missing an ace on the par-3 4th by an inch. I then played the remaining eight holes in +10, which included three straight double-bogeys (8th to the 10th) and four straight three-putts (8th to the 11th).

I took a lot away from my round at Beaver Brook CC. Averaging about six GIR per round, I hit 10 that day. I had the great memory of an almost-ace. I discovered that I have a strong opinion that finishing a layout with two par 5s is an AMAZING design choice. Finishing Beaver Brook meant that I had now played all three courses in Hunterdon County. I also realized that my wrist was seriously injured, and that playing before it healed was probably a dumb idea.

But most of all, I found another public course that I would highly recommend to anyone.

Advertisements
Number 62 (Beaver Brook Country Club)

Numbers 59, 60, and 61 (Ramblewood Country Club – Red, White, and Blue)

20170701_072914

Date played: 7/1/2017

If Ramblewood Country Club has any claim to fame in the list of public courses in New Jersey, it’s that it’s one of Ron Jaworski’s properties. Jaworski owns seven golf properties in all, and Ramblewood is the newest of his properties, purchased in 2016. It would be my first of the five in NJ.

Ramblewood CC is a 27-hole layout, split into the Red, White, and Blue nines. It was a bit of a drive for me, so I always had it in the back of my mind to play all three nines in one trip. Making a Saturday morning tee time though, I was conscious of not leaving my wife burdened with the kids for too long. To give myself the best shot at a quick round, I booked a 6:00 am tee time.

 

White (Number 59)

Meeting a Twitter golf buddy for the round, we were able to get squared away with the starter and sent out immediately. I was able to hit the fairway on the first, but bladed my approach slightly to put me over the green. After chipping on through a tree, I three-putt from 31 feet for double-bogey. I made five straight bogeys from the 2nd to the 6th, before finally making par on all three holes into the turn to finish +7.

The White nine is generally unremarkable. It is mostly level, with some rolling features. All three nines of the property are set inside a community, so there are house-lined holes and a few tree-lined fairways. Apart from its average routing and features, it is a well-maintained golf course. Greens are kept in great shape, and they roll slightly faster than the average public course in NJ.

 

Blue (Number 60)

After finishing the White nine, we knew we were making good time, so we jumped onto the Blue immediately. I continued the par streak on the par-3 1st and par-4 2nd. On the par-5 3rd, I lost a ball in a lateral hazard after my 3-wood flailed out to the right, and was only able to make double-bogey after the drop. After bogeying the 4th, I hit four of five fairways from the 5th to home. However, poor ball striking meant I only carded par on 7 and 9. Bogeys on the rest of the holes meant I would finish the Blue in +6.

Coming off the 9th, the starter was swarmed with groups, everyone waiting to get out – night and day from the start of our morning. We looked down at the time, and it was only 8:35. There have been a number of superlatives on my journey so far, but 2 hours 35 minutes is far and away the fastest I’ve finished 18 holes of golf.

The Blue made for more interesting play than the White as it is much tighter, particularly on the 3rd, 4th, and 8th holes, and it’s in equally good condition.

 

Red (Number 61)

Amidst all the groups looking to get out, full credit goes to the starter who was able to get us on the 1st tee of the Red nine in just 30 minutes. Perhaps excited that I was going to be able to complete all three nines, I completely botched the first. A weak and lazy drive meant I would slice it into the lateral hazard. A drop and a couple attempts to get onto the green resulted in triple-bogey.

That pretty much set the tone for the rest of the nine, over the course of which I played mediocre golf at best. There wasn’t anything particularly challenging about the Red nine, but I couldn’t put anything together. The highlight was certainly my approach on the 8th, a relatively long par 4. After pulling my drive left, I had 184 yards uphill to the green. I also needed to draw around some overhanging branches, and it came off just right. With a bit of draw, I was able to avoid the bunker on the right, and land just off the green. I chipped my third shot to 3 feet.

The lowlight was missing the 3-footer for par.

I was able to par the 9th to close, which was nice. But, with the 2nd being the only other par on my card for the Red, I would finish +9. Starting at 9:05 and wrapping up at 11:11, the Red nine took nearly as long as the first 18 we played.

The Red nine is much like the White, and perhaps even a bit more open. Again, the overall condition was great. Being the weekend before Independence Day, all pins flew American flags, which – according to my playing partner – is something Jaworski does at all his courses around the holiday. My only complaint was the “replay rate” we got for the Red nine. The fees for the pre-booked White-Blue combination was $69 ($34.50 for each nine), but we paid $37 for the Red. Not the end of the world – and both rates included the cart – but I would expect a rate that would beat an online booking through the course website.

Overall, however, the price of golf at Ramblewood is commensurate with its quality relative to other public golf in NJ – just a touch above average. I look forward to playing the other Jaworski-owned properties.

Numbers 59, 60, and 61 (Ramblewood Country Club – Red, White, and Blue)

Number 58 (Cedar Creek Golf Course)

20170617_082107 - Copy

Date played: 6/17/2017

Thirteen.

I’d love to tell you that ‘13’ was the number of pars I made during my round at Cedar Creek Golf Course, or even the number of fairways or greens that I hit in regulation; maybe even the number of Pro V1’s I found. Unfortunately, ‘13’ was my score on the 18th hole. I’ll get there in a bit.

Cedar Creek became the 58th public course I’d played in New Jersey when a golf buddy at work let me know he found a coupon for discounted greens fees. Always one for new courses and discounts, I was definitely game. The course would also be my second in Ocean County, after Lakewood Country Club.

Coincidentally, the drive up to the clubhouse at Cedar Creek is interestingly similar to that of Lakewood CC. Both are set behind recreational parks, with the clubhouse roads lined with baseball fields. Unlike Lakewood though, Cedar Creek holds itself out as a municipal course.

The round started in a bit of light rain and damp conditions, but absolutely playable. There was nothing much to complain about in my front nine. I only hit two fairways, but managed to play to +7 at the turn, and that included a triple-bogey on the par-4 6th. While I started the back nine with another triple-bogey on the 10th, I played 11 through 15 in +3, which meant I was +6 through six on the back. Not ideal, but I wasn’t complaining either.

The 16th plays downhill, and a really well-struck drive left me only 20 yards from the green. I was only able to get my approach to 15 feet, but it was certainly a makeable birdie. Leaving the putt about a foot short, I walked up to tap it in as my playing partner was squaring up over his putt.

I missed.

I missed the one-footer. I didn’t just lip out or burn the edge. I completely ******* missed about a cup right. My buddy’s head, focused on his putt, just slowly turned up towards me, acknowledging the horror he too had just witnessed. After successfully knocking in the second one-footer, I just said, “yep, that’s bogey”.

I would bogey the par-3 17th, which means I’m sitting at 82 with one hole to go. Despite a couple triple-bogeys and a miserable three-putt on 16, I saw a respectable score in my future

… and then we go to the 18th.

There’s always a disturbing finality on the 18th tee box. You realize that your round has come to an end. If you’re having the round of your life, you’re probably just focused on “bringing it home”. If you’ve played poorly, it dawns on you that this is your last chance at a decent memory from the round.

Here’s how my 18th at Cedar Creek went:

  • 1st shot: OB right
  • Tee up again…
  • 3rd: OB left
  • Tee up again…
  • 5th: Stays in play, ends up in the right rough
  • 6th: Lost/unplayable to the right
  • Drop
  • 8th: Ends up about 15-20 yards right of the green
  • 9th: Doesn’t quite make it to the green
  • 10th: Still not there…
  • 11th: We’re finally on
  • 12th: From six feet, the putt takes a tour around the back of the cup, makes a U-turn and spits back out at me, to about an inch
  • 13th: I drilled the one-inch putt

The ‘13’ would leave me at +23 for the day. That would be right up there with my worst score for the year, a +24 at Lakewood CC. Ocean County seems to have it in for me.

Despite the horrendous finish, I enjoyed the round at Cedar Creek. At $40 for a weekend round with a cart, it is certainly affordable golf. The condition is not great, but it’s not terrible either. There are a few burnt-out greens, but a majority of them roll well. There is a nice change of elevation throughout the course, especially on the back nine. The 11th is a nice long par-3 that plays uphill, and 12, 13, and 14 alternate going up and down this hill as well. The 15th is a real climb from about 130 yards in, and the 16th – as mentioned – plays well downhill.

Oh, and the 18th is downhill as well. Just don’t make ’13’ there.

Number 58 (Cedar Creek Golf Course)