Number 63 (Galloping Hill Golf Course)

Date played: 8/6/2017

If you’re a golfer who’s trying to play all the public courses in NJ, what do you do when you’re still recovering from a hand/wrist injury, but someone invites you to play a course you haven’t played before?

You go and play (like an idiot) of course.

If I haven’t mentioned it before, Twitter has been fantastic for meeting other golfers and golf enthusiasts, especially those that are willing to share in my journey. I’ve had some great discussions about different public courses in the state, which includes people’s feelings on best/worst layouts, great places to eat, and what actually constitutes a golf course.

Regarding that last point, Galloping Hill is everything you would want in a course, so long as you enjoy variety. Very much like Beaver Brook, Galloping Hill has a bit of everything. As its name implies, you have a number of great holes that play both up- and downhill, some of which make for great views of most of the course. I’ve realized that elevation change is something that may not be absolutely necessary, but it is greatly appreciated when I’m considering course design.

I scored poorly overall (+21), but most of that was due to two quadruple-bogeys and one triple. I had been playing decently through 7 holes, but I finished the front nine with quadruple and triple, making the turn at +13. I actually played well on the back nine, with the quadruple on the 14th the only real blemish. I came home in +8, despite the quad.

While I only three-putt once (on the 1st hole), I couldn’t really get anything to drop. I made only 23 feet of putts for the whole round, with 2.5 feet being the longest putt I made all day. My putting has been something that has plagued me forever, with only the occasional great putting round, peppered in between rounds of all-too-frequent misses within 5 feet.

The great part about putting at Galloping Hill is that there is ample challenge, both in the design/contouring of the greens and their speed. It is a course that is maintained exceptionally well overall, and the quality of the greens shows it.

As I mentioned earlier, there are great views on the course, particularly on the 2nd near the green and coming off the 6th green when walking to the 7th tee. I’ve heard that slow rounds can be a problem at Galloping Hill, but I think our round moved along just fine.  If I had one complaint about the course, it would be that the layout only features three par-3s and two par-5s (though the 18th is a beautiful finishing hole). Other than that, it’s a course I believe earns its price point ($66 to walk for a weekend round).

As a facility overall, it also has a shorter 9-hole course, which I love as a feature for new golfers. I can’t wait to get back and give it a go!

Advertisements
Number 63 (Galloping Hill Golf Course)

Number 62 (Beaver Brook Country Club)

Date played: 7/28/2017

Have you ever booked a tee time, and then realize that you had other commitments on the same day? Ever still try to make both happen? My story of the 62nd course on my quest went something like that.

Located in Annandale, NJ, Beaver Brook Country Club is a beautiful 18-hole layout that almost has a bit of everything. You could argue that it could use more water to contend with (if you’re a sadist), or perhaps some more forced carries (definitely sadist).

But, there ARE a couple forced carries, as well as a creek to deal with on a number of holes. There are a few good dog-legs, a drivable par 4, and a par 5 you can get to in two (if you’re a long hitter). There’s a par 3 where you can tuck the ball in REALLY close (more on that in a bit). There are narrow fairways, changes in elevation, and some approach shot-making decisions into well-placed pins on contoured greens. On top of all that, there is great service and the place is maintained wonderfully.

One of my closest friends let me know that he had won a certificate for a free foursome at Beaver Brook after winning a contest at an outing there last year. A free round for a new course on my journey was like a godsend. The tee time he booked was 2:18 pm. As I mentioned earlier, I had an obligation I forgot about, and that was at 6:30 pm. Only realizing this the day before the tee time, I needed a plan.

The issue was primarily the course being over an hour’s drive from home. Unsure of pace of play, I figured I would need to shoot for finishing about nine holes from the tee time and then heading out for my commitment. That meant I would just have to show up early and play nine beforehand. I would leave work early after a half-day, and finish the back nine just as we’d be called to the 1st tee by the starter.

Not quite.

It turns out that Beaver Brook doesn’t offer a nine-hole rate. I would guess that may be in part due to its interesting routing. The ninth hole actually finishes in a stretch across the clubhouse road and you don’t “make the turn” until the 13th green.

After talking to the staff in the pro shop and the starter a few times (shout out to Pam and Ed), they agreed to get me out for the going rate ($45 w/ cart). Figuring that it was a long way from home and – if I didn’t finish on that day – I’d have to come back anyway, this was as good as I could do. Alas, my free round became a normal round.

The starter (Ed) took me out to the 15th. I was able to play back to the clubhouse with no issue, and almost no wait. Only discovering at that point that the 10th tee was nowhere in sight, I decided to jump onto the par-3 14th, with the approaching foursome’s permission of course.

Having played 14-18, I figured a 2:18 tee time would be good enough to play the first 13 holes and get me home on time. After waiting for the rest of my group to show, we would be on our way at around 2:30. (Tardiness is next to godliness, am I right?)

Whether it was the anxiety of not getting out on time or the fact that I was playing with an injured hand/wrist, a great round eventually went bad. I played my first ten holes (15 to 18, then 14, then 1-5, if you lost track) in +5, which included missing an ace on the par-3 4th by an inch. I then played the remaining eight holes in +10, which included three straight double-bogeys (8th to the 10th) and four straight three-putts (8th to the 11th).

I took a lot away from my round at Beaver Brook CC. Averaging about six GIR per round, I hit 10 that day. I had the great memory of an almost-ace. I discovered that I have a strong opinion that finishing a layout with two par 5s is an AMAZING design choice. Finishing Beaver Brook meant that I had now played all three courses in Hunterdon County. I also realized that my wrist was seriously injured, and that playing before it healed was probably a dumb idea.

But most of all, I found another public course that I would highly recommend to anyone.

Number 62 (Beaver Brook Country Club)

Number 58 (Cedar Creek Golf Course)

Date played: 6/17/2017

Thirteen.

I’d love to tell you that ‘13’ was the number of pars I made during my round at Cedar Creek Golf Course, or even the number of fairways or greens that I hit in regulation; maybe even the number of Pro V1’s I found. Unfortunately, ‘13’ was my score on the 18th hole. I’ll get there in a bit.

Cedar Creek became the 58th public course I’d played in New Jersey when a golf buddy at work let me know he found a coupon for discounted greens fees. Always one for new courses and discounts, I was definitely game. The course would also be my second in Ocean County, after Lakewood Country Club

Coincidentally, the drive up to the clubhouse at Cedar Creek is interestingly similar to that of Lakewood CC. Both are set behind recreational parks, with the clubhouse roads lined with baseball fields. Unlike Lakewood though, Cedar Creek holds itself out as a municipal course.

The round started in a bit of light rain and damp conditions, but absolutely playable. There was nothing much to complain about in my front nine. I only hit two fairways, but managed to play to +7 at the turn, and that included a triple-bogey on the par-4 6th. While I started the back nine with another triple-bogey on the 10th, I played 11 through 15 in +3, which meant I was +6 through six on the back. Not ideal, but I wasn’t complaining either.

The 16th plays downhill, and a really well-struck drive left me only 20 yards from the green. I was only able to get my approach to 15 feet, but it was certainly a makeable birdie. Leaving the putt about a foot short, I walked up to tap it in as my playing partner was squaring up over his putt.

I missed.

I missed the one-footer. I didn’t just lip out or burn the edge. I completely ******* missed about a cup right. My buddy’s head, focused on his putt, just slowly turned up towards me, acknowledging the horror he too had just witnessed. After successfully knocking in the second one-footer, I just said, “yep, that’s bogey”.

I would bogey the par-3 17th, which means I’m sitting at 82 with one hole to go. Despite a couple triple-bogeys and a miserable three-putt on 16, I saw a respectable score in my future

… and then we go to the 18th.

There’s always a disturbing finality on the 18th tee box. You realize that your round has come to an end. If you’re having the round of your life, you’re probably just focused on “bringing it home”. If you’ve played poorly, it dawns on you that this is your last chance at a decent memory from the round.

Here’s how my 18th at Cedar Creek went:

  • 1st shot: OB right
  • Tee up again…
  • 3rd: OB left
  • Tee up again…
  • 5th: Stays in play, ends up in the right rough
  • 6th: Lost/unplayable to the right
  • Drop
  • 8th: Ends up about 15-20 yards right of the green
  • 9th: Doesn’t quite make it to the green
  • 10th: Still not there…
  • 11th: We’re finally on
  • 12th: From six feet, the putt takes a tour around the back of the cup, makes a U-turn and spits back out at me, to about an inch
  • 13th: I drilled the one-inch putt

The ‘13’ would leave me at +23 for the day. That would be right up there with my worst score for the year, a +24 at Lakewood CC. Ocean County seems to have it in for me.

Despite the horrendous finish, I enjoyed the round at Cedar Creek. At $40 for a weekend round with a cart, it is certainly affordable golf. The condition is not great, but it’s not terrible either. There are a few burnt-out greens, but a majority of them roll well. There is a nice change of elevation throughout the course, especially on the back nine. The 11th is a nice long par-3 that plays uphill, and 12, 13, and 14 alternate going up and down this hill as well. The 15th is a real climb from about 130 yards in, and the 16th – as mentioned – plays well downhill.

Oh, and the 18th is downhill as well. Just don’t make ’13’ there.

Number 58 (Cedar Creek Golf Course)

Number 54 (Hanover Golf Club)

The northernmost public golf course in Burlington County, Hanover Golf Club was the 54th stop on my journey. Hanover holds itself out as “one of New Jersey’s finest daily fee courses”. I thought this was an interesting way to advertise itself as open to the public, presumably as opposed to a required annual membership fee.

A windy February day, with breezes blowing between 10 and 20 mph, I probably needed to bring my best golf to score well, and I came up short. Tee boxes seemed to be limited for the winter, with some holes only playing from Forward boxes. I took the liberty of teeing off as close to the White tee boxes as possible on a number of holes, especially on the back nine.

The first hole was played from 339-yard Forward/Red box, and I striped a 3-wood to leave an approach of 117 yards. Seemed like a fantastic start. Unfortunately, I overshot the green with a 9-iron, landing just at the back of the green, but bouncing off the firm ground. A poor chip left me with 27 feet, and I two-putt for bogey. The 2nd and 3rd were a par 4 and 5 respectively, both right in front of you. The fairways aren’t wide, but they certainly aren’t narrow either. Errant tee shots on both, and fat third shot on the par 5 meant I would card bogey for both. Then came the fourth hole.

The fourth is on the card as 128 yards from the White tees, playing as the third-easiest hole. That day, however, it only played about 95 yards from the Forward box. Though short, it’s a well-designed, downhill par 3. There’s a tree hanging over the left and some water to be avoided short and right of the green. I missed the green, got back on, and then inexcusably three-putted from 10 feet. I missed a two-footer. (There, I said it. Happy?)

I made the turn in better form, going +2 through the next five holes. The highlight of those five holes was making the par-5 8th green in two. The lowlight was three-putting for par (this time, from 45 feet).

Coming in, the wheels were coming off my game. An interesting stretch of five straight par 4 holes, 10-14 should be ones to score on. The 11th is an uphill, but drivable hole, playing at 276 yards from the White tees. I managed to pull it left under a small tree in some deep junk, take four more strokes to get on the green, and two-putt for 7. The 12th takes you all the way back down the hill. The White tees were well up, so I opted to play from the 399-yard blues.  Hitting the green in regulation, I three-putt for bogey. Finally, on the 14th, I managed to make my first par of the back nine.

The 15th, 16th, and 17th, are pars 3, 4, and 3 respectively. The only notable part of this stretch is that there is a massive difference between the Blue and White tee boxes on the 15th, with the Whites playing at 116 yards to the Blue’s 185.

Then, there’s the 18th

Playing at par 5, it can arguably be a par 6 for the average golfer. While the scorecard says 614 yards, the website advertises its “monster” finishing hole as 621 yards from the tips. The White tees are marked at 496, but I decided to finish from the Blue tees at 583 yards. Although it’s straight, it’s a beautiful hole. Downhill for most of the way, you’re probably level with the green at about 200-225 yards. The bottom of the fairway is a pond running perpendicular to the hole sitting across the entire width. The last 100-125 yards or so play back uphill. I hit a very good drive to the left side, but shanked my second shot. I managed to hit my third shot well, across the pond and 40 yards short of the hole. My approach from here left me at 13 feet below the hole, which was a gift, as it slopes severely from back to front. Unfortunately, my par putt lipped out, and I had to settle for a bogey finish to end the day at +18.

It’s difficult to judge the condition of a course during a winter round. I’ve since seen pictures of the course both on Hanover’s website and elsewhere. It seems to be kept in great shape during peak season, and if prices are comparable to my winter round ($34 with cart), it’s certainly worth a visit. If for nothing else, just to play the “monster”.

Number 54 (Hanover Golf Club)

Number 45 (Clearbrook Golf Course)

Set in an adult living community in Monroe, Clearbrook Golf Course is a 9-hole layout that offers some of the cheapest golf in the central New Jersey area. At just over 2,800 yards from the White tees, it’s also one of the shorter regulation-length courses I’ve played to date (something I enjoy).

The 1st hole is a very reachable par 5, so long as you can negotiate the slight dog-leg-left fairway from the tee. If you push or slice your tee shot – for right-handed golfers – there is a landing area to the right of the fairway if you don’t hit it too far. However, your second shot will potentially be obscured by trees, forcing you to hit across the fairway to get anywhere close for a third shot.

Needless to say, that’s how I started my round.

An unassuming par 3, the 2nd hole makes for excellent reprieve if you made a rough start. 133 yards on the card – 140 from the “tips” – playing slightly uphill, this hole is played with a scoring club from the tee for most average golfers. A well-struck and well-placed tee shot allowed me to make a two-putt par from 18 feet. Coming off the green, a short walk through the woods to the next tee box reveals that the course turns 180° to come back in the other direction, parallel to the 1st and 2nd holes.

The 3rd and 4th holes are a straightforward par 5 and par 4 respectively, while the 5th is a medium-length par 3. I hit a decent shot that went a bit long and left, and subsequently made a meal of my attempted chip back onto the green. Overthinking the slope of the green, I thought I should take my 60° wedge to loft it softly onto the putting surface. Loft it I did… but short of the green. I hit my next chip heavy, and two-putted from 33 feet. First double bogey of the round carded, and onto the well-designed sixth hole.

(Spoiler alert: it caught me out.)

The 6th has a pond directly between the fairway and the green – sat where the fairway would normally end – with a narrower fairway continuation to the side of the pond, shifted about 15-25 yards left. My phone had died, so without my GPS (#excuses) I relied on my playing partner that day to tell me that the pond was “probably about 270 or 275 yards out”.

It wasn’t.

Headed directly for the pond, I hit a straight drive which took one hop and went in. It was probably about 235-240 yards out. Thankfully, I hit my drop (3rd shot) onto the green and was able to two-putt for bogey. Knowing the yardages now, the hole makes for a great tee-box choice. Hitting short of the pond leaves your second shot directly in line of bunkers guarding the front of the green. Attempting to go left of the pond requires a very accurate drive, and anything left of that fairway section will potentially be obscured by a few trees.

I bogeyed the 7th and did the same on the 8th, which was a crime, because I putt off the green from 56 feet (14 feet beyond the hole). The green does have a slight ridge in it, so the putt did need to go up and over, but it was simply a terrible lag (something I definitely need to work on).

The 9th is a 154-yard par 3, guarded by a front-right bunker, with the pin – on that day – set in the front of the green just beyond it. I hit a good tee shot onto the green, left of the pin, and found myself with 16 feet for birdie. Breaking right-to-left – a putt I prefer over the sinister left-to-right opposite – I hit it on a good line, but lipped out. After not doing much good on the day, tapping in a one-footer for par was a pleasant way to end the round. Too many bogeys and one double meant I finished +8 through the nine holes.

Clearbrook bills itself as “one of only two courses in the U.S.” with a 9-hole layout that has different tee boxes that allow for “the experience of playing 18 holes”. The scorecard lists the tees I played from as a White/Blue combination. Normally, I would have expected that the Blue tees were simply longer for each hole, so that your “back 9” would just be tougher overall due to the added distance. I hadn’t noticed it during the round, but the White tees I played from are actually longer on the 3rd, 5th, and 9th holes. The 3rd hole even plays as a 332-yard par 4 from the Blues as opposed to a 483-yard par 5 from the Whites.

Having seen all nine holes of the layout, I’m happy to consider this course marked off the list as Number 45. I would even add that the course is good value for the money. Nine-hole rates are around $20 to walk. Knowing that the White/Blue combination might offer something different for 18 holes is a nice bonus, and a reason to go back.

Number 45 (Clearbrook Golf Course)

Number 44 (Skyway Golf Course at Lincoln Park West)

Opened in June 2015, Skyway Golf Course in Jersey City is easily the youngest course I’ve played, and with its youth comes beauty. Having the distinction of being the only public golf course in Hudson County – a small county of almost entirely urban geography – Skyway is breathtaking.

I mentioned how East Orange Golf Course’s downtrodden reputation is juxtaposed against its affluent background, but Skyway is juxtaposition in its purest form. Newborn lush fairways and greens set against aging man-made materials: concrete, asphalt, and steel. The drive up to the diminutive parking lot is on an absolutely beaten and forgotten road, littered with potholes and lined with truck yards and industry to the right. It is the last road you’d imagine leading to a clubhouse. But once you’ve entered and walked onto the course, it is another world.

Being on the course feels like being inside a sci-fi dome. With countless dunes and rolling fairways, almost the entire nine-hole layout is elevated from the topography of the surrounding area. From the tee box on the third hole or from the 5th green, that road to the clubhouse seems like a dried-up asphalt river at the bottom of a valley off in the distance. You have incredible views in multiple directions, with the Manhattan skyline to one side, the remaining marshlands on the inlet from the Hackensack River on the other, and the Pulaski Skyway – for which the course is named – joining the two.

Considering golf an 18-hole event, I was sort of resigned to the fact that I would only be playing nine holes. As I described, all of that resignation went out the window once I was on the course. I could have played three holes and been grateful to have been there.

Whether it was inspiration from the splendor of the course, or if it was just that I was “on”, I enjoyed a great round of nine holes. I carded nothing higher than bogey, and finished +5 on the day. It was hard-earned by scrambling most of the round. I only hit three of the nine greens in regulation, but my short game carried me. On the 5th, I hit a soft-landing sand wedge from 40 yards that ran eight feet to the pin and lipped out after going 450 degrees around the cup and stopping just an inch outside. On the 7th, I hit the pin once again and lipped 180 degrees around it, stopping at 2.5 feet. I finished with only 9.2 feet of putts made.

Having been in Jersey City for work for the day, there was definitely the excitement of playing a round of golf after a day at the office. But being on the first tee at Skyway was something beyond that. I experienced a deep appreciation for everything they accomplished in designing and building the course, and I felt like I was truly somewhere special, which is what golf courses should feel like.

The word “infant” comes from the Latin for “unable to speak” or “speechless”. If you are a golfer within 30 miles of Jersey City on the New Jersey side, you must play this infant course. Unable to speak for itself, it may just leave you speechless.

Number 44 (Skyway Golf Course at Lincoln Park West)

Golf: How far have you driven?

A number of things have happened since my last post:

  • I have played four more courses for the first time, bringing my total to 38 (20.5%).
  • The weather in New Jersey has gotten significantly warmer.
  • I have moved home base for my golfing operations… which is to say I’ve moved altogether.

Looking back on this quest and reflecting on my recent move, I realized this is the fourth location from which I’ve ventured to new golf courses. Raised in Bergen County, I moved to Middlesex County with my wife-to-be in 2006, then to Somerset County in 2009, and we now call Mercer County home. With all of the moves and different home bases in mind, and knowing that I still had a long way to go in terms of New Jersey courses left to play, I wanted to get a sense of how far I’ve already gone. How far have I actually driven to play these courses?

Gathering the data told me some noteworthy things about my golf timeline.

  • While I first picked up a set of golf clubs sometime in the late 1990s, I didn’t play a regulation-length course in New Jersey until 8/13/2005.
  • Between 2005 and 2010, I only played seven different NJ courses. That’s an average of about 259 days between each new course.
  • After a hiatus from 2010 to 2013, I’ve played 31 additional courses. That’s an average of about 36 days between each new course.
  • I found out about my golf quest on 10/15/2015. Since then, I have played 11 new courses, an average of about 18 days between each new course.
  • To date, the furthest I’ve driven to a golf course (one-way) is 63.3 miles.

Taking a look at each course already checked off my list and factoring in when I first played them and where I had lived at the time, I was able to calculate that I have driven a total of 1,942.4 miles (round trip). To put that in context, here are the distances to different golf landmarks across the country from my current location in NJ:

How far have you driven?

Golf: How far have you driven?